Bok Choy with Roast Pork and Straw Mushroom

Bok Choy with Pork and  Mushroom 1

This dish is definitely Chinese in Spirit, although the use of a western white wine in the sauce is a bit of a departure from the traditional. I came up with this as a way to use some leftover meat from my Crispy Roast Pork Hock experiment earlier this week. You could use any leftover pork you like but, ideally, you want some with a bit of crunchy rind still attached… 

The Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups of Roast Pork;
  • 2 cups baby Bok Choy, large leaves sliced into smaller pieces;
  • Canned Straw Mushrooms;
  • ½ a small Onion, thinly sliced vertically;
  • 4 small dried chilies;
  • 1 tbsp. minced or pureed Garlic;
  • ¼ cup Chicken Stock;
  • 2 tbsp. Soy Sauce;
  • ¼ cup White Wine;
  • 1 tsp. Sugar;
  • 1 tsp. Cornstarch.

The Method

Bok Choy with Pork and  Mushroom 2

Here you can see the roast pork I am using, and the basic shape in which it has been sliced. There is some crispy rind attached to some of the slices.

Bok Choy with Pork and  Mushroom 3

First, mix the cornstarch with enough water to make a slurry then add the stock, wine, soy sauce and sugar. Set this aside to use later. Next, heat a tablespoon or so of oil in a pan over high heat and briefly sauté the bok choy. When a few brown spots appear on the stems and the leaves begin to wilt, remove to a bowl.

Bok Choy with Pork and  Mushroom 4

Replenish the oil and as soon as it is hot, add the dried chili. As soon as they start to darken, add the onion and stir until just softened.

Bok Choy with Pork and  Mushroom 5

Add the mushrooms, pork and sauce mixture and stir (gently so as not to break the meat slices) until all is heated through and the sauce is thickened.

Bok Choy with Pork and  Mushroom 6

Finally, add back the bok choy. Continue to stir a minute or so longer and then serve immediately.

 

8 thoughts on “Bok Choy with Roast Pork and Straw Mushroom”

  1. What a very appetizing ‘semi fusion’ dish if one may use such a term! Almost worth it to make roast pork which I rarely have in the house . . . such a flavoursome combo. I have to smile at your use of wine ~ in Australia verjuice has become quite popular because of a local but world famous chef and TV presenter called Maggie Beer: it is pressed grape juice sans alcohol – many of us buy it from her farm shop. Some months back I quickly needed a tad of liquid in a stirfry and grabbed for a couple of tbs of mine: loved it so much that it has become part of many of my strifries!! So I love your use of wine ahead of trying your recipe! Thanks!!!

    1. I have many recipes calling for verjuice… all 4, 5 and 6 centuries old. Verjuice was a common souring agent in the middle ages. It was often unripe grape juice but other sour juices were used as well. I had no idea it was making such a culinary comeback!

      1. Well, it is here amongst those ‘seriously interested’ in food, tho’ quite a few local cookery and ‘women”s magazines now have recipes including it and I believe one of our supermarket chains carries it. Beloved doyenne and all that 🙂 !

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