Month: April 2017

Stuffed Anaheim Peppers

Stuffed Anaheim Peppers 1

Today’s recipe doesn’t attempt to reproduce any particular ethnic recipe but, with the addition of cumin and added hot sauce, is probably closest in spirit to being Mexican. There is a bit of preparation involved but none of it terribly difficult and the result can make either a main course, if served with, say, rice, or a nice appetizer… Continue reading “Stuffed Anaheim Peppers”

Spice: Cubeb

Cubeb 1

These little drumstick shaped things are the berries of a plant in the pepper family grown chiefly in Java and Sumatra. They are most commonly called Cubeb Berries (or just plain Cubeb), but are also known as Cubeb Pepper, Java Pepper, and (by reason of their stemmed appearance) Tail Pepper. They were a common culinary spice in medieval Europe but have largely disappeared from kitchens today. You won’t likely find them in your local supermarket, but you can find them on-line. They are worth giving a try, however, as even though a member of the Pepper family, they taste nothing like the variety in common use… Continue reading “Spice: Cubeb”

Spicy Pickled Bell Peppers

Spicy Pickled Bell Peppers 1

I frequently have a jar of pickled ‘Banana Peppers’ in my fridge for all sorts of purposes including making sandwiches, nachos (especially), and other things where a little fillip of tangy spice is needed. These are available commercially in my local store all the time, and they are pretty decent, but I like making my own stuff and have long wanted to stop buying the store bought variety. Unfortunately, the type of peppers I want are hard to come by and any substitutions I might use (Jalapeño, or Anaheim, for example) are generally only available in green, which. I find, turn an unattractive greyish color after they have been pickling for a while.

Anyway, I hit upon the idea of using tiny red and orange bell peppers (which have become increasingly common of late), and adding smaller, very hot chillies to the pickling mix to provide the right ‘bite’… Continue reading “Spicy Pickled Bell Peppers”

Foodstuff: Horseradish Root

Horseradish Root 1

This rather gnarly looking object is not a withered old tree branch, but rather is the root vegetable that is the source of that sharp, pungent white condiment usually only encountered in jars purchased at the supermarket. Most people are well familiar with the commercial product as an especially good accompaniment to roast beef, but it does have other uses as well. It is sometimes used in ‘Bloody Mary’ concoctions, it works well as a sandwich spread for all sorts of creations (and not just those using cold beef), and it is very commonly used to provide the sharp bite of the standard seafood cocktail sauce. Quite a few Cole-slaw sauces also use it too. The purchased varieties are fine to use, as long as you don’t let them age too long, but there are some benefits to using the fresh article that are also worth investigating… Continue reading “Foodstuff: Horseradish Root”

Mint-Jalapeno Beef Ribs

Mint-Jalapeno Beef Ribs 1

Today’s post illustrates a rather interesting use for the Mint-Jalapeño Salsa I prepared for you a little while ago. I was wondering how mint could be used to produce the same delicious results with beef as it does with lamb, and using my salsa seemed like a good place to start. I am not giving you a formal recipe, as such, since, once you have the salsa prepared, all you need do is slather it on some good quality beef ribs and let them marinate overnight before giving them a good roasting in a 450 degree for about 30 minutes until nicely browned and the meat is just beginning to pull away from the ends of the bone.

As for the success of the experiment, the meat was done to a turn, and I loved the flavor as a whole but I was a bit disappointed that the mint flavor was milder than I would have liked. In truth, I wasn’t even sure that mint would go well at all with strong beefiness of the ribs but the flavor combination ended up being delicious… just not, unfortunately, strong enough. Next time, I may try marinating beef ribs in the more potent sweet-and-sour flavours of my more traditional Mint Sauce.

Sweet and Sour Fish

Sweet and Sour Fish 1

I have, of late, been trying to include a bit more fish in my diet, even though fresh fish is not easily available in these parts much of the time. Today, however, I came across some nice cod fillets in my local store. Normally, with cod, I like the basic battered ‘English Style’ fish and chips, but starchy carbs are something I am trying to avoid and so I opted for a much simpler and lighter Chinese style dish… Continue reading “Sweet and Sour Fish”

Squid ‘Blossoms’

Squid Flowers 1

On a few occasions, I have ordered squid dishes in restaurants that consisted of the tentacles only. Mostly, these are the large type, and often come battered, as separate pieces, before being deep-fried. When I buy very tiny squid (which have been the only sort available up in these parts of late), I like to keep the whole tentacle ‘assembly’ in one piece and deep fry them without batter. The effect, once the central ring with the attached tentacles hits the oil, is to make them curl into shapes that remind me a little of flower blossoms.

Anyway, if you are cleaning tiny squid, or else have purchased them with the whole tentacle section packed separately, you can fry them up in about thirty seconds or so (with or without a light dusting of cornstarch) and serve them piping hot as a lovely little appetizer. You can provide a dip of your choice, if you like, but they are best with nothing more than a quick squeeze of lemon juice.

Foodstuff- Harvest™ Brand Haggis

Haggis 1

I have had Haggis about a half-dozen times in my life (almost exclusively in restaurants) but I have never tried making one from scratch and have never had one of any sort inside my home. I was quite excited, therefore, to find a prepared commercial variety in one of our local stores. Curiously, it was the only one there and there had been none there the day before. Why ever that might be I don’t know (did the store only order one, I wonder?), but I wasn’t going to lose the opportunity to sample it so I snapped it up.

Anyway, the label contains the promotional tag ‘The Good Taste of the West’, which struck me as a little unusual, but then I saw the product is made in Saskatchewan. This is, among all the provinces and territories, the only one I have yet to visit, so I can only assume that they have permitted at least one Scottish person across their borders (possibly with a view to cornering the international haggis trade, perhaps?)… Continue reading “Foodstuff- Harvest™ Brand Haggis”