Rajasthani Roti
Rajasthani Roti

Rajasthani Roti

The Indian State of Rajasthan has a good variety of Roti, or flatbreads. This particular recipe is a bit of an improvisation, but it is named after the north-western state because it includes Ajwain Seed, which is widely cultivated in that region. This roti is actually a type of Paratha but it differs from the basic form used in my Simple Paratha Recipe in that a different technique is used to produce the characteristic flaky texture, and the dough is made with a blend of both wheat and chickpea flours.


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Simple Parathas
Simple Parathas

A Simple Paratha Recipe

The Paratha is specific type of ‘Roti’, or flatbread. In Indian cuisine, the simplest form of Roti is the ‘Chapati’, while the Paratha, is a more complex variety, in which the dough is oiled (with a vegetable oil or ghee) as it is rolled out, then folded, oiled, and rolled again several times so that, when cooked, the result is a lovely flaky-textured, layered bread. The recipe here uses only 4 ingredients, including water, and is about as simple as a Paratha recipe can be.


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A Stack of freshly cooked Roti
A Stack of freshly cooked Roti

A Simple Roti Recipe

There are many different types of flatbread in Indian cuisine. Those known as ‘Chapati’ and ‘Paratha’ are probably the most widely recognized by westerners, but both of these, along with a host of others, can be collectively grouped under the umbrella term ‘Roti’.

Roti can be exceeding simple, consisting of nothing more than rolled out rounds of a flour and water dough, or they may incorporate oil, salt, or other seasonings, and require more complex rolling and folding techniques. Today’s Simple Roti Recipe does use salt, oil and some additional optional seasoning, but the actual method for preparing the bread is exceedingly easy.


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Dough being rolled for dumplings
Dough being rolled for dumplings

The Basic Dumpling Wrapper Dough we are making here is of the unleavened, wheat flour variety. It is probably the most common dumpling wrapper dough all around the world, especially among home cooks. You will find it in such diverse types as Chinese Jaozi, Xiaolongbao, and Wontons, as well as the Korean Mandu, Japanese Gyoza, and the internationally ever-popular ‘Pot-Stickers’. The ingredient list is very short, as you will see, and virtually anyone can learn how to make a versatile dough with this extremely simple little recipe.


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