Main Plates (Page 9)

The Main Plate recipes listed here include Western-style entrées, standalone meals, and substantial dishes of the sort served at the banquet table

Pasta with Truffles and Cream

Pasta with Truffles and Cream

Pasta with Truffles and Cream

This dish builds upon the basic form of a Carbonara in that it is finished by stirring a mixture of beaten Egg and Cheese into the cooked Pasta to make a Sauce. However, this recipe also uses Onion and Garlic (a strict no-no in a classic Carbonara), and it boosts the decadence level by using Cream and Truffles for an even richer, silkier finish.

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Keema Pie

Keema Pie

Keema Pie Recipe

In Indian cuisine, the name ‘Keema Saag’ can be used to refer to any number of dishes which combine a ground meat (the ‘Keema’), with some form of vegetable greens (the ‘Saag’). Here, the pie you see above is essentially a Keema Saag, cooked with common Indian spices, which is then incorporated into the form of a traditional Shepherd’s Pie. As such, a classic Western ‘comfort food’ is transformed into something novel, and, for most Westerners, just a little bit exotic.

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Chicken with Almonds and Peppers

Chicken with Almonds and Peppers

Chicken with Almonds and Peppers

Almond Guy Ding dishes have long been ubiquitous on the menus of Chinese restaurants catering to Western tastes. Of then dish is listed as ‘Chicken Almond Guy Ding’, which is a bit of a redundancy as the ‘Guy Ding’ is Cantonese for ‘Diced Chicken’. There are plenty of variations, of course, and, beyond the requisite Chicken and Almonds, a vegetable. or vegetables. Will usually be included. Here, Red and Green Bell Peppers are used, and everything is finished in a sauce that is sweet and rich with Hoisin Sauce.

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Kung Pao Dragon & Phoenix

Kung Pao Dragon & Phoenix

Kung Pao Dragon & Phoenix

The terms ‘Dragon’ and ‘Phoenix’ when used the name of a Chinese dish, means that the dish contains Shrimp and Chicken together. This particular preparation uses both and is prepared in general ‘Kong Pao’ style. It deviates a bit from the traditional Chinese method of Kung Pao cookery, but it uses peanuts, has a sweet and sour background, and uses  Red Chili Oil for a hint of smoky fire.

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