Posted in Recipes

Simmered Enoki

Simmered Enoki 1

Today’s recipe was inspired by one I saw in a fairly old Japanese cookery book. It is Enoki Mushrooms (Enokitake in Japanese) which are braised in rice wine and soy, and it generally follows the Japanese recipe except that, instead of Mirin, I uses Chinese Rice Wine, and, rather than cooking oil, I use butter. Butter does occasionally get used in some Japanese preparations, but it is an uncommon ingredient and I have used it here because it lends a nice depth of flavor and richness…

I began with a 100 gram package of Enoki. I cut away the dense, somewhat fibrous common ‘root’ and then separated the individual mushrooms from each other, leaving some of the tiniest still grouped together.

Cooking is easy… Just melt a tablespoon or so of butter in a pan on medium heat, add the mushrooms and stir until coated, then add about three tablespoons of rice wine (or mirin if you prefer), a teaspoon of light soya sauce, then cover the pot and let the mushrooms braise until tender and limp. Finally, before serving, add in a little finely sliced or shredded green onion (green part only).

That’s it….

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Grilled Octopus Skewers

Octopus Skewers A

I did up this little appetizer using a couple of octopus tentacles I had left over from using the rest of the beast in a different recipe. I first thought of doing something sort of Asian with ginger and soy, but I decided, instead, to marinate my sections of tentacle with lemon juice and herbs before gilling them on skewers.

The tentacles had been blanched and frozen before use and so needed no further tenderizing. I cut each into sections and then marinated the pieces in a few tablespoons of olive oil, along with a tablespoon or so of lemon juice, a quarter teaspoon of pureed garlic, and about one eighth of a teaspoon of dried thyme with just a few needles of rosemary crushed into the mix with a pinch of salt. I let this sit for about a half hour so.

Finally, I threaded the pieces on skewers and grilled them over high heat for a couple of minutes on each side, basting with the marinade as I did so. I served them, as you can see, over thinly sliced lemon and the result was very pleasant indeed. I have not used thyme with octopus or squid before and I liked the combination. Next time, I think I may try a more complex Herbes de Provence blend…

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Shrimp Bites

Shrimp Bites 1

Recently, our local supermarket has been carrying some very nice cocktail sized shrimp and, since they don’t appear that often, I have bought quite a few packages and have been using them in different ways. I opened one pack to make scrambled eggs with shrimp and, since I didn’t need the whole package, I put together the little fritters you see above. They are somewhere half-way between an Indian Pakora and Japanese Kakiage, and, for this recipe, I kept everything very simple and clean… the only seasoning in the fritters is a dash of salt and the batter is made very light with egg-white rather than whole egg… Continue reading “Shrimp Bites”

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Soy-Pickled Cucumber

Soy-pickled Cucumber 1

Today’s post is really just the result of me playing around with a number of different pickling recipes from both Chinese and Japanese cuisine. In many cucumber pickles, small ‘dill-pickle’ sized ‘cukes’ are used, and the pickling is by way of lactic acid fermentation for at least part of the process. Here, I am using large, seedless, English cucumbers and I am ‘quick-pickling’ using rice vinegar as the agent, and soy sauce, ginger, sesame seeds and rice wine for seasoning… Continue reading “Soy-Pickled Cucumber”

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Shrimp and Pork Balls

Shrimp and Pork Balls 1

Today, I am going to show you a couple of little dishes made with the same basic  ‘dumpling filling’ mix I made for my Shrimp and Pork Stuffed Mushrooms  a while ago. As I mentioned in that post, the combination of shrimp and pork is one of my most favorite dumpling fillings but I wanted to use it in a few non-dumpling applications as well. The stuffed mushrooms were first but then I used the remainder of the mix to make some ‘balls’ that I almost think of as ‘dumplings without wrappers’ … Continue reading “Shrimp and Pork Balls”

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Lamb Chop Tapas

Lamb Chop Tapas 1

I love lamb chops …

Typically, I just grill a few up and serve them with some mashed spud and a couple of other veggies, and, of course, a bit of mint sauce or mint jelly. As such, I generally think of lamb chops as a main course sort of thing but, for today’s post, I tried an appetizer type offering along the lines of a Spanish ‘Tapas’ … Continue reading “Lamb Chop Tapas”

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Fake 'Oyster Sauce' Experiment

Fake 'Oyster' Sauce

I began experimenting quite a while ago, attempting to make a sauce something along the lines of the standard Chinese Oyster Sauce. Essentially, an oyster sauce is the essence of oyster extracted through long simmering and then sweetened and thickened in various ways. I was aiming for the basic taste, except, for my experiments thus far, I used shellfish ingredients other than oyster…

In the inset in the above picture, you can see the brown, viscous, and thick sauce I produced, along with a simple stir-fry dish I cooked using it (It was pork, green pepper and onion as best as I remember). I made the sauce almost two years ago (and the stir-fry a few months later), but I shelved the project for the time being and only resurrected it recently. I still had a jar of the sauce in the fridge and I was a little amazed to find that, not only had the sauce maintained very much the same consistency and viscosity (and not dried out as I might have expected), but it also had preserved its original taste to an amazing degree.

My method was to boil some cooked lobster shells, a little leftover lobster meat, and some dried shrimp in water, reducing it until the ‘broth’ was quite strong. I then cooked this once again along with soy sauce, unflavoured corn syrup, and a little sugar, once again reducing everything until the consistency was like a commercial oyster sauce.

In actual oyster sauce, the flavor is sweet and salty with a vaguely shell fish background; It is oyster-like to a certain degree, but really, any suitably sweet,  marine type flavor would work, and my lobster-shrimp concoction managed to reproduce the essential taste quite well. In any event,  I want to keep working at this and reduce the process to a simple ‘recipe’ in the near future, and I will certainly post my work as it develops…

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Broccolini with Sesame Miso Dressing

broccolini with sesame miso dressing 1

Today’s simple little recipe is one I derived from a common Japanese way of dressing cold greens (notably spinach). The dressing in question is made by toasting sesame seeds then grinding them to a paste along with a little sugar and mirin, sake and soy sauce. The result is called ‘Spinach Gomae’ (if using Spinach) and, while I like the dressing generally, I also find that it can have a bit of a bitter after taste.

I decided to try something that resulted in the same sweet/sesame flavors, but avoided any bitterness and, accordingly settled on Hummus as a milder (if not very Japanese) base for the dressing. I also incorporated a little light miso for depth, and then included a rich Japanese Sesame oil for the proper sesame punch. For today’s dish, I am using Broccolini rather than spinach to make a nice little appetizer salad…

Ingredients

  • 2 cups pre-blanched Broccolini, trimmed of thick stems;
  • 3 Tbsp. Hummus;
  • 1 tsp. Light (white) Miso;
  • 1 tsp. Lemon Juice;
  • 1 Tbsp. Dark Sesame Oil;
  • 1 tsp. Sugar;
  • 1 – 2 Tbsp. Mirin;
  • Sesame Seeds for garnish.

Assembly is super simple … First, blend together all the ingredients except the Broccolini and sesame seeds and mix to a smooth paste. Allow this to sit for at least 20 minutes to allow the flavors to blend.

When you are ready, add the dressing to the Broccolini and mix. The idea here is not to drench, or drown the greens in the dressing, but rather just add enough to coat the pieces with sauce. Arrange the greens attractively on individual serving plates and sprinkle with sesame seeds for garnish. Serve…

That’s it.