Smoked Salmon Pasta Salad
Smoked Salmon Pasta Salad

Smoked Salmon Pasta Salad

This little salad was inspired by a recipe I tried for a hot pasta dish using Smoked Salmon. I didn’t like it much, as it turned out, chiefly because, as with canned tuna, I find that the delicate and best flavors of smoked salmon are lost when it is heated. I still had some of the salmon left, however, and it struck me that pairing it with pasta in a cold preparation should work just fine. The recipe I settled upon for this post is not only very tasty, but dead easy to make.


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Japanese Cucumber Salad
Japanese Cucumber Salad

Japanese Cucumber Salad

This very simple little preparation is an example of a Japanese Sunomono, or ‘vinegared’ dish. There are all sorts of variations on the general theme but this is about as basic as it gets. You can, if you like, simply use plain rice vinegar for the dressing but, today, we will be using a pre-made Japanese Nihaizu Seasoned Vinegar.


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A Japnese Nihaizu Seasoned Vinegar
A Japnese Nihaizu Seasoned Vinegar

Two Basic Japanese Seasoned Vinegars

Nihaizu and Sanbaizu are both seasoned vinegars used in Japanese cuisine, sometimes as marinades, or the bases for dipping sauces, but primarily as dressings for the salad type preparations known as ‘Sunomono’. The basic forms for each are extremely simple and can be varied in any number of ways to suit personal needs and tastes.


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Vichyssoise - Cold Leek and Potato Soup
Vichyssoise – Cold Leek and Potato Soup

Vichyssoise

Two things… First of all, the name of this Classic Soup is pronounced ‘Vishee-SWAAZZ’. Many North Americans pronounce it ‘Vishee-SWAH’, as though omitting the final consonant were the truly refined and properly Frenchified pronunciation. It isn’t.

Secondly, thick soups of pureed leek and potato have been around forever, but the version created in the early 20th Century and named ‘Vichyssoise’ has traditionally been served cold, often at very formal meals. Personally, I like this type of soup served nicely chilled, but I also love it served piping hot with crusty bread. In French cuisine, a hot ‘Vichyssoise’ would more properly be called a ‘Potage a la Parmentier’.

Of course, you could always just call it ‘Leek and Potato Soup’


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