Filipino Pork Binagoongan
Filipino Pork Binagoongan

Filipino Pork Binagoongan

In the cuisine of the Philippines, a Binagoongan is a dish in which the primary ingredient is cooked with the Filipino fermented shrimp paste known as Bagoong Alamang. This particular version features pork as the main ingredient, and the tangy sweetness of the tomato based sauce is rounded out by both the umami depth of the shrimp paste, and just a touch of chili heat.


Read More →

Oyster Chowder with Canned Oysters
Oyster Chowder with Canned Oysters

Oyster Chowder with Canned Oysters

Canned Oysters are a pale shadow of the freshly shucked real article, but that doesn’t mean you should ignore them completely. I always like to have a can or two in my pantry for those times when fresh oysters are not available, or for when you just want to put something together quickly, without all the usual shucking around. This super quick chowder recipe makes a nice hearty dish for one, if served with crusty bread and maybe a small salad, and a lovely little starter soup for two.


Read More →

Crispy Fried Onions
Crispy Fried Onions

Crispy Fried Onions are a terrific topping on many different foods. Indeed,  I can’t imagine serving an Indian Biriyani without including crispy fried onions on top of the dish, and you can also find them being added to many rice, meat and vegetable dishes in  India, Indonesia, and a host of other Eastern cuisines.

In the West, crispy fried onions are widely available commercially either in the form of flakes or ‘strings’, and they are often used on burgers, in sandwiches, and scattered over salads, baked potatoes, and cooked vegetable dishes. The commercially packaged varieties are, unfortunately, often tasteless or stale, but it is easy enough, if a little time-consuming to make them yourself at home.


Read More →

Sesame Cucumber Salad
Sesame Cucumber Salad

Sesame Cucumber Salad Recipe

There are many cold dishes in Asian cuisine featuring cucumbers which are first salted and then later served in a dressing of some sort. Sometimes, the cucumber is allowed to ferment slightly in order to produce a nice lactic acid pickle and, at other times, as here, the salting time is just brief enough to soften the flesh and make it receptive to flavorings. Today’s dish definitely falls within the latter category. It doesn’t hail from any particular cuisine but would be equally at home on a Chinese, Japanese, or Korean table.

> Read More →