Tag: Beef

Braised Beef Shank

Braised Beef Shank 1

A while ago, my Irish blogger friend, Conor Boffin, did a very nice post featuring Braised Beef Shanks he called Daub of Beef. I remembered that I still had some beef shank in my freezer and I decided to use his dish as an inspiration for something along the same lines. I have chosen a very nice Merlot for my wine addition, and I am also using a little Madeira as well. Unlike Conor, I am not using fresh mushrooms, but I do add some chopped, reconstituted Shiitake early on and I also add some diced carrot towards the end. This dish turned out as nicely as I am sure was Conor’s… [ Continue reading “Braised Beef Shank”

Beef Tataki with Horseradish Sauce

Beef Tataki with Horseradish Sauce 1

The little appetizer you see above is made with the Japanese style rare beef, which I have already introduced to you as Beef Tataki, and pairs it with a Horseradish Sauce and a little salad garnish made from lightly salted shreds of cabbage. If you look at my post on Horseradish Root, you can see the basic sauce I made from it in the last picture. The sauce here is essentially that, although I blended it to be a little smoother and added some finely minced scallion and parsley. The combination that results here is something of an east-west fusion, although the spirit is mostly Japanese as the horseradish is very similar to Wasabi and shredded raw cabbage is the standard accompaniment for Tonkatsu. Anyway, although I found the beef needed a little salt at the table, this was a very nice little light lunch…

Mint-Jalapeno Beef Ribs

Mint-Jalapeno Beef Ribs 1

Today’s post illustrates a rather interesting use for the Mint-Jalapeño Salsa I prepared for you a little while ago. I was wondering how mint could be used to produce the same delicious results with beef as it does with lamb, and using my salsa seemed like a good place to start. I am not giving you a formal recipe, as such, since, once you have the salsa prepared, all you need do is slather it on some good quality beef ribs and let them marinate overnight before giving them a good roasting in a 450 degree for about 30 minutes until nicely browned and the meat is just beginning to pull away from the ends of the bone.

As for the success of the experiment, the meat was done to a turn, and I loved the flavor as a whole but I was a bit disappointed that the mint flavor was milder than I would have liked. In truth, I wasn’t even sure that mint would go well at all with strong beefiness of the ribs but the flavor combination ended up being delicious… just not, unfortunately, strong enough. Next time, I may try marinating beef ribs in the more potent sweet-and-sour flavours of my more traditional Mint Sauce.

Keema Pie

Keema Pie 1

This dish I have been working on is something of an east-west fusion in that it incorporates a traditional Indian dish known as ‘Keema Saag’ in the basic form of the more well-known Shepherd’s Pie. Basically, ‘Keema’ is minced (ground) meat, while ‘Saag’ refers to a whole range of greens, with spinach often being used in many western renditions of Indian dishes. Here I have used both Kale and Swiss Chard with the result that you get a Shepherd’s Pie with the added spiciness of a curry, combined with a good way of getting some greens into your diet… Continue reading “Keema Pie”

Pan-fried Beef Satay

Pan-fried Beef Satay 1

Satays, or skewers of seasoned meat or fish, are Indonesian in origin but have been adopted by the cuisines of many nations and there countless varieties and permutations in the flavorings and modes of service. Traditionally, these are grilled treats, being an especially popular ‘street food’, but if grilling is not an option you can do a passably decent job in your frying pan at home… Continue reading “Pan-fried Beef Satay”

Experiment: Lemon Marinated Flank Steak

Marinated Flank Steak 01

For many years, I worked at the Regional Hospital in Fredericton, New Brunswick, and, despite the general reputation of awfulness for hospital food, the meals served at the staff cafeteria there were mostly pretty good. One item they did from time to time was a pan-fried flank steak that was cooked with, if not also marinated in, lemon juice. It was served under the rather spurious name ‘London Broil’ but was always nicely tender and delicious.

For those unfamiliar, a London Broil refers not to a particular cut of steak, although this mistake is often made, but rather to the fact that the cut, usually a tougher one like flank steak or top-round, is first marinated and then served in slices after grilling or broiling. The version served at the hospital in Fredericton failed to meet these criteria in a couple of ways… it was pan-fried and served in one piece… but it was definitely a flank steak, which is very fibrous and can often be very tough if not carefully prepared. Today, I am going to try and reproduce the general effect of the dish I enjoyed all those years ago… Continue reading “Experiment: Lemon Marinated Flank Steak”

Bean Paste Beef and Eggplant

Bean Paste Beef 1

Some time ago,  I took a look at Lee Kum Kee’s Spicy Bean Sauce and then featured it in a Ma Po Style Eggplant dish (which gave effect to the intended use of the jarred condiment). As I mentioned in the latter post, I was not impressed with the Lee Kum Kee product as a proper ‘Ma Po’ style sauce but I still found it pretty decent and, here, I have paired it once again with eggplant. This time, however, I am using the slender Japanese variety rather than the fatter European ones, and I have replaced the ground pork with strips of beef… Continue reading “Bean Paste Beef and Eggplant”

A Simple Meatloaf

Simple Meatloaf 1

I haven’t made meatloaf in many years; chiefly because my wife, who likes burgers and meatballs, HATES meatloaf. However, since I have been living an enforced bachelor life of late, I decided to try one again. I have purposely made this recipe fairly simple. Many people add all sorts of other ingredients like carrot, celery, or onion into the meat mix but I find the texture suffers and I prefer to serve these sorts of things separately… Continue reading “A Simple Meatloaf”

Dry-fried Sour and Spicy Beef

Dry-fried Sour and Spicy Beef 1

Dry-frying, in Chinese cookery, can mean both that a dish is fast-fried with little or no sauce, and also that the main ingredient is fried, often in more than one step, to yield a dry, chewy result. Here, both ends are achieved with beef that is first deep-fried and then stir-fried along with celery and carrot. That vegetable combination is quite common in dry-fried beef preparations but here I have expanded on the usual theme by lightly pickling the veggies first and then spiced the whole affair up with lots of garlic, cumin and dried chili for a definitely Western Chinese flavor…  Continue reading “Dry-fried Sour and Spicy Beef”