Posted in Product Reviews

Superior Quality Brand Preserved Radish

The radish in this particular case is the large variety most commonly known by the Japanese name Daikon. This very versatile vegetable is preserved by a variety of different techniques all across Asia, especially by lactic acid fermentation, but the most basic method is by salt curing the flesh to dehydrate it and prevent microbial spoilage. The Chinese were probably the first to treat the vegetable this way but the technique is widely used elsewhere, especially in Korea and Thailand. Indeed, the product pictured above is of Thai manufacture… Continue reading “Superior Quality Brand Preserved Radish”

Posted in Recipes

Sichuan Red-Cooked Beef (紅燒牛肉)

I have made mention of the Chinese cookery technique known as 紅燒, or ‘red-cooking’ in previous posts, and have even illustrated it in my Red-Cooked Pork Hocks recipe. That particular dish was more in keeping with the Southern and Eastern interpretations of the idea in which meats are braised in a seasoned liquid (basically a Master Sauce) and given a reddish color from the included soy sauce and, in some cases, from caramelized sugar.

In Sichuanese cookery, the seasonings are a bit different (often including Sichuan Peppercorns and additional aromatic spices) and the red-color is augmented with the use of 辣豆瓣酱, or Chili Bean Paste. Today’s dish does not follow any particular recipe (and for an excellent example of a traditional version see Fuchsia Dunlop’s rendering in Land of Plenty) but it does represent the basic idea…  Continue reading “Sichuan Red-Cooked Beef (紅燒牛肉)”

Posted in Recipes

Banchan: Namul of Daikon Greens

A few days ago, I featured a recipe for Gamja Jorim, which is an example of a particular type of Korean Banchan (or side-dish) in which the main ingredients are simmered in a seasoned liquid medium. Today’s post involves another class of Banchan known collectively as ‘Namul’. A namul consists of seasoned vegetables (sometimes cooked, sometimes not) and for this recipe I will be using some of the Daikon greens grown by my wife this past summer. Other greens could be used, but this recipe is probably best suited to the coarser, more fibrous sorts…  Continue reading “Banchan: Namul of Daikon Greens”

Posted in Recipes

Daikon Kimchi

As a follow up to my basic Brine Pickled Daikon post a few days ago, I am, for today’s recipe, going to use Daikon again. This time, however, I am going to make a variety of the Korean style pickle known as Kimchi. May people will be familiar with Kimchi, at least in passing, but  the sorts made with Daikon are not generally as well known in the west as are the cabbage varieties.

As one might expect, there are countless versions of Kimchi… Daikon, Cabbage, or otherwise… but the most familiar combines a main vegetable along with secondary items, chiefly green onions, ginger and garlic, and then these are fermented in a spicy paste of red chili. In Korea, it is also very common to add seafood products which, when fermented, add a rich depth to the overall taste. Oysters are quite common, as is fish sauce, or else the very pungent Korean Salted Shrimp. I am going to be using Dried Shrimp in today’s recipe, but other than that, it will be pretty straightforward…  Continue reading “Daikon Kimchi”

Posted in Recipes

Brine Pickled Daikon

Today, I am going to be using some of my wife’s homegrown Daikon to make a very simple but tasty brine-fermented pickle. Since our Daikon yield this past season was very small, the tiny daikon we grew can be pickled whole rather than cut up in chunks as is more common.

Most people are familiar with the Korean style of pickle known as Kimchi, but usually only with the very popular type in which vegetables, most notably cabbage, are fermented in a fiery medium containing lots of chili powder or paste. A lesser known type (at least outside of Korea), is the sort sometimes referred to as ‘Water Kimchi’ is simply made using a clear brine. This sort, most commonly made with a radish of some sort, also usually combines other mild flavor additions such as green onions, ginger and, especially popular in Korea, sliced Asian pear. Today, my recipe will be very simple indeed. As such, there is nothing particularly Korean about it but it does capture the basic idea and is thus a good introduction to the process of brine-pickling in general…  Continue reading “Brine Pickled Daikon”

Posted in Ingredients

Foodstuff: Daikon

For many people, daikon is largely only familiar as the small pile of glistening white shreds artfully added as a garnish to plates of sashimi or sushi. This is a shame, though, as the giant white member of the radish family,’ Daikon’ in Japanese,’ Mooli’ in India and ‘Lobok’ to the Cantonese, is a very versatile vegetable and well worth incorporating into one’s regular menu.

Today’s post will not only allow us to take a look at this useful foodstuff, but will also allow me to share with you an update of my wife’s (now concluded) Greenhouse Project …  Continue reading “Foodstuff: Daikon”