Tag: Dim Sum

Dim Sum: Steamed Sparerib in Black Bean Sauce

Steamed Rib with Black Beans 2017-07 1

Steamed pork Ribs, especially with Black Beans, is something I cook regularly at home but it is also a regular on dim sum menus everywhere. I most commonly prepare this as an entrée sized dish but a small plate of two or three makes a lovely snack at any time…

Generally, small sections of pork rib are dusted in flour after being lightly seasoned and then steamed with Chinese Salted Black Beans along with soy sauce, or rice wine, so that a nice light sauce is produced. Chilli can be included, as well as sugar, and the flour thickens things very nicely.

What was different about the ones I ate in in Vancouver’s New Town Restaurant recently (and pictured above) was the addition of a slice of Chinese Preserved Sausage. This added a unique umami depth and obviated the need for any additional sugar or other sweetener. I have not come across this before but I will be incorporating it in my own preparations in the future for sure…

Experiment: Tea-Fried Squid

Tea-Fried Squid 1

Somewhere, in my Chinese cookery book collection, I have a recipe for Shrimp that are prepared by poaching in green tea (complete with reconstituted tea leave shreds). As yet, I haven’t tried it but, not long ago, I saw a picture of squid that had been fried after dusting with greenish fragments that weren’t identified. It was clearly an Asian preparation (I forget where I saw the picture), and I suspected the green ‘bits’ weren’t any common herb as might be used in the west. I wondered if, perhaps, it might be powdered tea. Anyway, the idea sounded interesting and so I put together the little appetizer you see pictured above. The idea is still rather a ‘work in progress’, but the first attempt was interesting enough that you might like to try something along the same lines yourselves… Continue reading “Experiment: Tea-Fried Squid”

Shrimp and Pork Stuffed Mushrooms

shrimp-and-pork-stuffed-mushrooms-1

Combining shrimp with pork is quite common in Chinese cookery and a well seasoned blend of ground pork and chopped shrimp is one of may favorite dumpling fillings. That being said, I wanted to experiment with the typical filling for dishes that don’t include the carb load of a dumpling wrapper and today’s post shows you the first of a few little ideas I tried… Continue reading “Shrimp and Pork Stuffed Mushrooms”

Scallop Clusters

scallop-clusters-1

The technique used in the preparation of these little appetizers is very much like the Japanese ‘Kakiage’ style of Tempura. However, I have departed from the Japanese roots a little by combining chopped scallop meat, not only with shredded Wakame seaweed, but also some finely diced Chinese Preserved Sausage. I still want to play around with the basic theme in variations to come, I think, but the result here was very good indeed … Continue reading “Scallop Clusters”

Dim Sum – Steamed Pork and Peanut Dumplings

Steamed Pork and Peanut Dumpling 1

潮洲蒸粉粿

I had these dumplings at Urban China in the City of Edmonton some while ago. The English name given on the menu describes the content well enough but the Chinese Character name more particularly identifies them as a specialty of the Cantonese town of Chaozhou commonly known as ‘Fun Gor’. You should be aware, though, that the town and the dumplings both have a host of different spellings and can appear together on a menu (to list just a few possibilities) as:

  • Teochew Fun Gor;
  • Chiu Chow Dumpling; or,
  • Chaozhou Fen Guo

This type of dumpling has a starch based wrapper that is translucent when steamed. It is typically made with wheat or tapioca starch (or a combination thereof) and flour is sometimes added, with rice flour being the most common. Pork and peanuts are invariable components of the filling but shrimp, both dried and fresh, are often included, as are white radish, black mushrooms, and cilantro.

The version you see pictured above has the standard starch-based wrapper and is of a fairly common shape (although you can often find them formed as a flat, half-moon, with the pleat on the side). These ones were quite large and a little unwieldy when trying to manipulate them with chopsticks, but they held together well and didn’t fall apart. The pork presence in the filling was a bit bland, while the coarsely chopped peanuts added some texture but little taste. Most of the flavor actually came from dried black mushroom, with a little cilantro in the back ground. The dumplings were not bad, overall, but definitely not the best ‘fun gor’ I have ever had…

By the way (and for those interested), the first two characters in the Chinese menu name indicate Chaozhou (or Chiu Chow, etc.) while the middle character (pronounced zhēng, in Mandarin) means ‘steamed’. The last two characters identify the dumpling type and yield the ‘Fun Gor’ pronunciation but they are actually non-standard deviations from the typical menu listing . Usually, the characters 粉果 are used for this sort of dumpling (and the pronunciation is the same) but, here, the restaurant has employed 粉粿, instead. This makes a bit of linguistic sense in that the final character translates as ‘cooked rice for making cake’, but. In usual renditions, the standard character (果) means fruit. Anyone have any information on this point?

 

Dim Sum: Grilled Abalone and Meat Buns

Grilled Abalone and Meat Bun

鮑魚生煎飽

This delicacy, which I was served at Urban China in Edmonton this past July, was very interesting from both a culinary and linguistic standpoint. The buns of stuffed, leavened dough, were described as being ‘grilled’ on the English menu but the penultimate character in the Chinese name means to ‘pan-fry’, which was clearly the case here. However, each bun was nearly the width of my palm so I rather suspect that they must have been steamed first.

The filling contained both abalone and pork and was very tasty. The abalone was diced very small, and there wasn’t a great deal of it (abalone is very expensive) but it did add a nice, sweetish marine flavor to the umami of the meat. There was, unfortunately, some cilantro added, which I dislike, but it was in small enough amount that it didn’t diminish my pleasure.

For those interested, the Chinese name has a bit of a poetic quality as the first and last characters are both pronounced ‘bao’, albeit with a fractional difference in tone. The first two characters specify Abalone, but can be read as ‘abalone fish’, indicating how the Chinese categorize this animal. Interestingly, the first character does not contain the ‘insect/bug radical’ as do most of the characters for various types of shell-fish.

I was a bit confused by the middle character (生, pronounced ‘shēng’). This usually indicates an item that is fresh or raw, and I first thought it indicated that fresh rather than dried abalone had been used except that the placement of the character was wrong. I have since learned that it forms a compound with the next character and that a生煎 bun is a particular specialty of Shanghai.

The very last character is curious and I could use some help… Many bread and dumpling delicacies are specified by the generic包character in their name. Here, the final character includes, you will note, 包as its right half, and the pronunciation of both is just about the same. The meaning of the 飽character, however, is ‘eat until full’ so I am not sure if the person who drafted the menu used the wrong character, or whether they were employing a well-known Chines pun. Can anybody shed some light on this?

Dim Sum: Deep Fried Lobster Dumplings

Deep Fried Lobster Dumpling B

香菜龍蝦角

I wasn’t quite sure what to expect when I ordered this particular dim sum offering. The final character in the Chinese menu name (角) usually indicates a dumpling made with rice flour and wheat starch but these had a wrapper that was more like those used for won tons and they also had the shape of dumplings generally identified using the 餃 character.

At first, I misread the first two characters in the Chinese name as being ‘Celery’, and it wasn’t until after I placed the order that I recognized them as meaning ‘Cilantro’, which I heartily dislike. Fortunately, there was no hint of that herb (or celery either, for that matter) either visibly or in the taste.

The filling was very nice and tasty but it was little drier and less tender than I expected. I doubt the restaurant would be as fraudulent as to substitute shrimp when lobster was clearly specified, but they must have used a western variety of lobster as it clearly was not the succulent east-coast sort. To my surprise, this dim sum was served with a little dish of mayo on the side. This really didn’t appeal to me, actually, and I just used a little soy sauce which went well. The wrapper was nicely crunchy and the overall experience was quite good.

By the way, for those who are interested, the second to last character when standing alone means ‘shrimp’ but the preceding letter means dragon and, in Chinese, a ‘Dragon Shrimp’ (pronounced lóngxiā, in Mandarin) is a lobster…

 

 

Dim Sum: Duck Feet with Taro 香芋鴨掌

Duck Feet with Taro

When I was served this particular dim sum dish I thought at first I had been given chicken’s feet in error. A quick investigation, however, revealed that the feet in question were indeed webbed and I am rather sorry I didn’t think to photograph one of them ‘unfurled’ for you as well. Anyway, I have had duck’s feet a fair number of times but I have to say that this was probably my least favorite of all… Continue reading “Dim Sum: Duck Feet with Taro 香芋鴨掌”

Review: All Happy Family Restaurant

10011 106 Ave., Edmonton – Website

All Happy Family 1

Date of Visit: July 8, 2015

I saw this place from a taxi while being driven back to my hotel in downtown Edmonton and a few days later I walked back for a spot of supper. The walk wasn’t all that far but it did take me through a rather tatty neighborhood and, in the end, my effort wasn’t well-rewarded… Continue reading “Review: All Happy Family Restaurant”

Review: Urban China

10604-101 St., Edmonton – Website

Urban China  1

Date of Visit: July 7, 2015

This was one of the spots I had discovered online when I was planning the culinary portion of my July trip to Edmonton. It has a pretty interesting looking menu online, as well as a few good reviews and, accordingly, I made my way there one morning at 11am for a leisurely dim sum brunch… Continue reading “Review: Urban China”