Tag: Duck

Notable Nosh: Chinese BBQ Pork and Duck

Chinese BBQ

Not long ago, I posted a review of Gain Wah restaurant in Vancouver’s Chinatown. I mentioned therein that, as I was leaving, the very friendly owner who was manning the BBQ station offered some barbecued duck to try. It was absolutely delicious and I told him I would be back. Well… I did just that and ordered the plate you see above which, for the princely sum of just $7.50, gave me a generous helping of both duck and pork along with a little dish of plum sauce on the side. Now, though I have been tempted by Chinese BBQ on various occasions, this happened to be my first real experience (aside from the gratis sampling two days earlier). Now… I have to say that I am a convert. The duck was not quite as good as the first taste, as that had been freshly cooked and still piping hot, but both meats here were exquisitely succulent and flavorful. There was a slight hint of 5 spice powder here and there (which I can take or leave), but, otherwise, this was perfect and the plum sauce really wasn’t needed for either. I have had thin slices of BBQ pork tenderloin in fried rice and noodle dishes once in a while, but that cut is exceedingly dry and nothing like the lovely, slightly fatty portion here. I am going to have to experiment in my own kitchen…

Dim Sum: Duck Feet with Taro 香芋鴨掌

Duck Feet with Taro

When I was served this particular dim sum dish I thought at first I had been given chicken’s feet in error. A quick investigation, however, revealed that the feet in question were indeed webbed and I am rather sorry I didn’t think to photograph one of them ‘unfurled’ for you as well. Anyway, I have had duck’s feet a fair number of times but I have to say that this was probably my least favorite of all… Continue reading “Dim Sum: Duck Feet with Taro 香芋鴨掌”

Three Shred Duck – 三絲鴨肉

Three Shred Duck 1

Today’s recipe is a very Chinese sort of preparation you can use for leftover duck. In many Chinese restaurants specializing in Peking duck, one often gets the skin and some of the meat served as a first course with Mandarin pancakes, the carcass is used to make soup, while the leftover meat is typically shredded and made into a stir-fry.

The meat I am using today actually came from a regular roast duck but it will do nicely here in this typical sort of stir-fry used for Peking Duck leftovers. Since my dish will use julienned celery, carrot and spring onion I am giving it a Chinese name that reflects the preparation. There are three shredded ingredients in addition to the duck, so it will be:  三絲鴨肉, or ‘three shred duck’ ….  Continue reading “Three Shred Duck – 三絲鴨肉”

Iqaluit Roast Duck

For our Labor day feast, I decided to roast a duck as it is one of my wife’s favorite meals. It is unfortunate that she will be going away on extended travel the day afterwards as she won’t get to help me with the leftovers but.. I guess I’ll just have to make do somehow. Anyway, rather than prepare the duck in one of  the Chinese methods I really like, I am just going to do a plain basic roast with a nice selection of ‘trimmings’… Continue reading “Iqaluit Roast Duck”

Foodstuff: Salted Duck Egg (鹹蛋)

Salted duck egg is a Chinese delicacy that is not especially well known amongst westerners. This is a bit of a pity really, because the eggs are really quite tasty and not nearly as alarming in appearance as the other preserved variety known as ‘Thousand year old eggs’. They are, as the name suggests, nothing more than duck eggs that have been preserved with salt, and they can be purchased raw (like the ones in the box you see above), or pre-cooked (as is the one in the plastic wrapping). The cooked ones are the most convenient in that they can be eaten, or added to some dishes right away, but the raw ones are definitely more versatile…  Continue reading “Foodstuff: Salted Duck Egg (鹹蛋)”