Tag: Greek

Review: A’Roma Meze – Ottawa

239 Nepean St, Ottawa

A'Roma Meze 1

Date of Visit: April, 2018 – Website

I have to begin by saying, right off the bat, that this place is a little gem of a find. I had it on my list of places to visit on four or five visits to Ottawa and never managed to make it until just recently. I am just sorry, now, that I didn’t get there earlier … Continue reading “Review: A’Roma Meze – Ottawa”

Red Pepper and Feta Meze

Pepper and Feta Meze 1

While I was in Halifax this past July, I enjoyed a salad made out of roasted red peppers and Feta cheese at the Efendy Turkish and Mediterranean Grill. It was very nice (and I made a note to try and do something similar at home) but I thought a modest change might improve things. The dish I had at Efendy was made by chopping both the feta and the peppers quite finely so that the texture was really quite smooth. I decided to go for a much ‘chunkier’ style…  Continue reading “Red Pepper and Feta Meze”

Greek Salad

Greek Salad 01

I have read, and been told, on many occasions that a ‘true’ Greek Salad never (ever) contains lettuce. I never questioned this assertion before but, when I came to actually reflect upon the notion, it began to strike me as a bit suspect. Think for a moment… one can probably encounter scores, if not hundreds of different types of salad in Greece so trying to specify the ingredients of a ‘Greek Salad’ is no different than dictating what constitutes an American, or a British Salad. What people mean by ‘Greek Salad’ is, I suspect, something that contains (vaguely) Greek ingredients but is only made in restaurants outside of Greece…  Continue reading “Greek Salad”

Recipe: Souvlaki

Souvlaki 01

For ages, I thought Souvlaki was just a Greek version of the Donair, except with grilled chunks of meat rather than the slices cut from those huge rotating cylinders of meat that always look rather like somebody stole a spare thigh from the local morgue. In fact, Souvlaki, in Greek cuisine are simply grilled skewers of meat and, while they can certainly be served Donair-fashion on pita bread with sauces and toppings, they may also be eaten out of hand as is, or come with fried potatoes, rice, or other sides. If asked, I probably would have guessed that lamb would be the most popular souvlaki meat in Greece but Wikipedia tells me it is actually pork and it is pork souvlaki I am making for today’s post…  Continue reading “Recipe: Souvlaki”

Grilled Zucchini Appetizer

Grilled Zucchini Meze 01

While in Halifax this summer, I enjoyed an interesting and very nice Mediterranean appetizer at the Efendy Restaurant I enjoyed it very much and, while I wanted to play around with the general theme, I departed from the original by basing it on grilled zucchini rather than fried eggplant…  Continue reading “Grilled Zucchini Appetizer”

Broccoli Meze

Broccoli Meze 01

Broccoli quite frequently appears as an item on crudité platters but, all too often, it ends up being dry, dull and rather uninteresting. Today’s preparation is not really a crudité, as such, as the broccoli florets are blanched before being dressed. However, it also can’t really be called vinaigrette salad either, for that matter, as the olive oil dressing includes no more than a few drops of lemon juice. Instead, I am calling this little appetizer dish a ‘meze’ as it is somewhat reminiscent of a Greek (or Turkish?) small plate I once encountered. Still, although I will be preparing broccoli florets in olive oil, I also stray a little from the original… Continue reading “Broccoli Meze”

Basic Kofta

Basic Kofta 01

Ground meat preparations are ubiquitous and occur in virtually every culinary tradition. However, there is one particular sort of meatball or patty whose range extends from India, where they are known as ‘Kofta’, through Iran, where they grace the table as ‘Kufteh’, and thence on to Turkey where cooks prepare yet another variety called ‘Köfte’. Elsewhere, from the Balkans, the Middle East, and North Africa, they occur as qofte, ćufta, kefta and kifta, and, although there are innumerable regional and national variations, it is clear the origin is the same. Today, I am preparing a variety that is almost as basic as you can get… It represents no actual variety in particular, but, with very few changes or substitutions, could stand in for just about any of the classic forms… Continue reading “Basic Kofta”