Tag: Korean

Salted Radish Banchan

Salted Radish Banchan 1

If you have eaten at a Korean restaurant you will recognize ‘Banchans’ as being the small (usually free) side dishes that accompany the main meal. Cabbage Kimchi is a standard offering but there are many others and I tend to rate a restaurant on the number and variety of selections provided.

Today’s offering is not an actual Korean recipe (to the best of my knowledge) but the combination of Preserved Salted Radish along with Gochujang chilli paste makes it a pretty good fit to the basic theme… Continue reading “Salted Radish Banchan”

Kimchi with Shrimp and Scallop

Kimchi with Shrimp and Scallop 1

Recently, I posted a recipe for a Simple Kimchi, and I mentioned that, in more complex varieties, Korean often boost the umami quotient of the pickle by include things like oysters, brined shrimp, or even fish guts. Today’s recipe does just that using shrimp and scallop except that, in this case, I am using Chinese style dried shrimp and scallops (the latter known as ‘conpoy’. I am also departing from the method I used in the Simple Kimchi recipe by using the slightly more traditional method of making chilli paste from scratch rather than using the pre-made Korean ‘Gochujang’ … Continue reading “Kimchi with Shrimp and Scallop”

Kimchi Soup (Kimchi-guk)

Kimchi Soup 1

Today, I am using some of my homemade Simple Kimchi to make a simple, but very tasty, soup. Many people may think of Kimchi as a simply a cold side-dish, or a Banchan (when included as part of a Korean meal). However, it is often used as a cooking ingredient as well. Most notably, it can be added to fried rice, it is used as a primary ingredient in particular types of Korean stews known as Kimchi-jjigae, and  is also used  in a class of soups collectively called Kimchi-guk.

As with any ‘traditional’ soup, there are as many recipes as there are cooks and, today, I didn’t have in mind any particular Korean recipe, rather, I have simply created a fairly straightforward Pork and onion soup to which I add a good, healthy dollop of Kimchi to give it a sour and spicy finish… Continue reading “Kimchi Soup (Kimchi-guk)”

Simple Kimchi

simple-kimchi-1

When most people hear ‘Kimchi’, they tend to think of the most common variety made with Napa Cabbage. In truth, though, many things are pickled to make Kimchi and, even with the cabbage variety, there are thousands of versions, from the simple to highly complex. Beyond the cabbage, and, of course, chilli, there can be other vegetables added (scallions, for example), and the umami quotient is often enhanced with some sort of sea product. This can be in the form of Korean Salted Shrimp, oysters, anchovy essence, whole dried anchovies, or even fish guts.

Today, I am preparing a very simple cabbage version using just chilli and scallion. I am departing from the most common method of adding chilli, which is usually done by making a paste from powdered chilli, water, and generally rice powder, or even, in some cases, wheat flour. Instead, I am doing what some recipes do, and using Gochujang, or Korean Chili paste, which carries its own umami punch. I will be adding this to my cabbage a bit later than is common for a couple of reasons. First, while I am fairly confident, having regard to the ingredients list, that there are no preservatives in my commercially made paste that will inhibit fermentation, I am not taking chances. Also, the paste is already fermented and the chilli and rice flour don’t need further fermentation to develop their flavors…. Continue reading “Simple Kimchi”

Sesame Miso Beef Ribs

Sesame Miso RIbs 01

I really love the Korean-style ‘Flanken-cut’ beef-ribs, especially for grilling. Usually, they are cut quite thinly (at least by my butcher) but lately, I have been buying some that are a good inch or so thick. For today’s post, I marinated some using a little Miso. This is a popular Japanese grilling technique that works especially well for fish but is also terrific with beef or pork. In this case, I have also included a good shot of sesame oil in the blend for a bit of a Korean touch as well…  Continue reading “Sesame Miso Beef Ribs”

Review: Minato Sushi, Halifax

1520 Queen St. Halifax, NS – (902) 420-0331 – Website

Minato Sushi 01

Date of Visit: July 4, 2014

On my recent trip to Halifax, I arrived to discover that I had a few hours to wait until my hotel room was ready and so I took a stroll around the nearby streets and came across this little place. It looked a promising place for lunch but, unfortunately, aside from the service, which was impeccable, the experience was not terribly impressive… Continue reading “Review: Minato Sushi, Halifax”

Banchan: Spicy Dried Squid

Banchan- Spicy Dried Squid 1

This Korean Banchan, or small-plate/side dish, uses dried squid and chili paste. There are many variations and quite a lot use the dried squid that is purchased pre-cut into fine shreds. This one, however, starts with a whole dried squid and the result is not just spicy and delicious but good and chewy as well…  Continue reading “Banchan: Spicy Dried Squid”

Barbecued Beef Rack

Barbecued Beef Rack 1

I was planning to do a Korean meal using some flanken-cut ribs I have in the freezer but then I saw an entire rack of beef ribs in our local grocery store. I have often seen individual ribs for sale, but this is the first time I recall seeing them in a rack locally and I thought they would work very nicely for what I had in mind. The marinade I settled on is typically Korean, featuring lots of garlic, ginger and soy but, rather than the Asian pear that is sometimes used as a tenderizer, I am using some canned pineapple instead… Continue reading “Barbecued Beef Rack”

Banchan: Namul of Daikon Greens

Daikon Namul 01

A few days ago, I featured a recipe for Gamja Jorim, which is an example of a particular type of Korean Banchan (or side-dish) in which the main ingredients are simmered in a seasoned liquid medium. Today’s post involves another class of Banchan known collectively as ‘Namul’. A namul consists of seasoned vegetables (sometimes cooked, sometimes not) and for this recipe I will be using some of the Daikon greens grown by my wife this past summer. Other greens could be used, but this recipe is probably best suited to the coarser, more fibrous sorts…  Continue reading “Banchan: Namul of Daikon Greens”