Tag: Paste

Foodstuff: Turmeric Puree

Turmeric Puree 1

Generally, the Turmeric in my kitchen pantry is the dried ground variety.  I have had the whole dried root before, but it is a pain to grind, and the fresh root, which I have used a few times, is quite hard to come by. I just saw this commercially pureed version the other day and I snagged a jar to test it out… Continue reading “Foodstuff: Turmeric Puree”

Foodstuff: Thai Roasted Chili Paste

Thai Roasted Chili Paste 1

This little food item has been sitting in my cupboard for quite a while waiting to be used but, this past weekend, I finally got around to giving it a try. In one sense, I was a little disappointed in that, despite being called a ‘chili’ paste, there was barely any heat to it at all. That being said, though, it did have other compensating qualities that still make it quite useful… Continue reading “Foodstuff: Thai Roasted Chili Paste”

Foodstuff: Thai Chili Paste with Holy Basil

Thai Chili Basil Paste 1

This little item arrived in a parcel of foodstuffs I recently ordered from down south. I had completely forgotten ordering it but I ended up being very glad I did …

It is a Cock Brand™ product, and at first, I mistook their logo as being the same as that of the manufacturers who make one of my favorite Sriracha Sauces. They are a different company, however, but when I checked their website, I saw a number of other products I have bought before and which I found to be very good.

The ingredient list on the label specifies the main components being, in descending quantity order: Soybean Oil, Holy Basil leaves, Garlic, Red Chili, Sugar, Salt, and Oyster Sauce.  The aroma, on opening the jar, is a little hard to describe in that no specific ingredient leaps out at one… It smells a little like a mild XO sauce, but with a very herbaceous quality … even a little ‘minty’.

The flavor, though, is terrific. It is somewhat fiery, although not blindingly so, and the oyster sauce and sugar lend it a marine sweetness. The Holy Basil, which can be quite pungent, even harsh, when used fresh in some dishes, is nicely mellow in here and really adds a very pleasant herbal note to the overall flavor.

Anyway, just before this product arrived, I was trying to think of a way to ‘round out’ a specific dish I had in mind… this suddenly seemed like the perfect addition and I will be posting the recipe very shortly…

Madrasi Grilled Beef

Madrasi Grilled Beef 01

A while ago, I posted a recipe for my homemade Madras Curry Paste and I wanted to try using it in something other than a ‘curry’ style dish. I came up with the idea of doing something along the lines of a Satay, but with the flavors of India and made the dish you see pictured abve. I made it is an appetizer but you could make larger (and more) skewers and serve them over rice for a more substantial course. Here, I served mine on a bed of finely shredded cabbage and Jalapeno peppers that were macerated in a little garlic salt before being tossed with some oil and lemon juice… Continue reading “Madrasi Grilled Beef”

Foodstuff: Miso

Miso 1.jpg

Many westerners have, at the very least, encountered miso, in the ubiquitous Miso Soup offered in almost every Japanese Restaurant. It doesn’t however, appear all that frequently in the cupboards or fridges of many western homes, and this is a pity, as the umami rich product is extremely versatile, being useful for flavoring soups, stews, and sauces, and also as a marinating ingredient and a pickling agent, to boot. Being rich in flavorful glutamates, it is, one might say, a ‘natural’ MSG … [ Continue reading “Foodstuff: Miso”

Pork Binagoongan

Pork Binagoongan 1

Given my occasional penchant for making up odd names for dishes I create, you may be excused for thinking that ‘Binagoongan’ falls into that category. Actually, the word ‘Binagoongan’ , in Filipino cuisine, means that a given dish is made using a ‘Bagoong ‘, and the pairing of fermented shrimp paste with Pork is a firm favorite in the Philippines.

Naturally, as with all classics, there are countless variations on the basic theme… Some renditions are basically sautés with very little sauce, whilst other are more like braises or stews. Generally, the ingredient list, beyond the pork and shrimp paste, tends toward the simple, with onions garlic, and a little chili being the most common additions. Some, but not all recipes, use tomatoes, whilst sugar and vinegar are almost invariably added in order to offset the saltiness of the Bagoong. Here, I use quite a bit of tomato, and the end result is heavy on the sweet and sour… Continue reading “Pork Binagoongan”

Foodstuff: Bagoóng Alamáng

Bagoong 1

If you have ever perused any Filipino cookery books, or Filipino recipes on the Internet, you have probably come across the name ‘Bagoong’ from time to time. Most sources confidently assert that ‘Bagoong’ is a fermented shrimp paste but this is only partly correct as there are many varieties made with fish as well. The fish types are collectively known by the name ‘Bagoóng Isdâ’, but there are also specific names depending on the type of fish being used. If a Bagoong is made with shrimp, however (and most commonly the super tiny variety known as ‘krill’, is used), then, strictly speaking, it should be called Bagoóng Alamáng.

Like Terasi and Belcan, or Chinese Shrimp Paste, the Filipino variety is manufactured by allowing small shrimp to ferment with salt. However, in the Philippines, the ‘raw’ product is only used in limited ways (generally as a condiment on cooked rice or fresh fruit), and, instead, it is generally cooked before packaging for sale, often with other ingredients such as garlic, chili or onion. Sometime ago, I actually featured the Lingayen Brand in a foodstuff post (which is a fairly complex variety), but I didn’t specifically identify it as a ‘Bagoong Alamang’. Here, I thought I might use the ‘Barrio Fiesta’ brand as a vehicle for a general discussion of the condiment as it is a pretty decent representative of the type … Continue reading “Foodstuff: Bagoóng Alamáng”

Foodstuff: Shrimp Paste – Lingayen™ Brand

Lingayen Shrimp Paste 1

I have featured a number of fermented shrimp products in these pages, including the dried paste variety used in South-East Asian cookery known as Terassi or Belacan, and the Lee Kum Kee version of a Chinese style Shrimp Paste. When I saw this particular product on our local store shelves, I initially assumed that it was a sauce of some type intended for stir-frying shrimp but, after closer inspection, I realized that the shrimp ‘fry’ refers to the baby shrimp typically dried and fermented to make culinary pastes and that the word ‘fry’ is used in the same sense as ‘small fry’ when referring to tiny fish.

The Lingayen™ Brand variety is a product of the Philippines (some may remember the name from the WW2 naval battle of Lingayen Gulf), and the paste, I was interested to learn, is a bit different than its Chinese and South-East Asian counterparts… Continue reading “Foodstuff: Shrimp Paste – Lingayen™ Brand”

Foodstuff: Sambal Oelek – Huy Fong™ Brand

Huy Fong Sambal Oelek 1

Hardcore fans of Asian food will likely recognize this brand and product, but if you haven’t come across it yet it really (really) bears trying. I have made, and regularly make my own Sambal Oelek, but this beats mine hands down and I can unstintingly recommend it as the best, and most versatile, commercial chili paste on the market… Continue reading “Foodstuff: Sambal Oelek – Huy Fong™ Brand”

Foodstuff: Anchovy Paste in a Tube

Anchovy Paste 1

My cupboard almost always has a can or two of anchovy fillets secreted away. Unfortunately, most of the recipes I use them in generally only use a portion of the can and, since the fillets really don’t keep well once the can is opened, I usually end up tossing what I don’t use right away. Anchovy paste in a tube, however, while not quite as good as the whole fillets, has the advantage of allowing you to use just a little while keeping the rest for extended periods and is thus extremely useful to have on hand… Continue reading “Foodstuff: Anchovy Paste in a Tube”